The band, not the straps, provides most of the support in the bra. The band should fit securely but not tightly. You should be able to fit a finger between the bra band and your body. A new bra should fit best in the loosest row of hooks, because the bra will loosen with wear. You will switch to the tighter rows of hooks over the life of the bra. The band should not ride up. If there are gaps at the bottom of the cup, the band is too loose, a sign it is time to buy a new bra.

Laura Schubert, co-founder of pubic-hair-oil company Fur, says ODDOBODY’s underwear is “perfect” — especially the brief. “It’s a classic,” she says. “I love a classic brief because they are comfortable and easy to wear. The stitching and fabric ensures that they don’t bunch or have weird lines.” Schubert also likes that the brand’s pieces are made of 100 percent cotton, and that ODDOBODY “promotes speaking comfortably about bodies, health, and identity.”
Shallow breasts: If your breast tissue is evenly spread over a wider area, with less projection, you probably have a shallow shape. (Another tell-tale sign: having breast tissue near your collarbones despite being relatively small-busted.) Shallow breasts fit best in balconette or demi-cup bras, with a cup that's open on top and cut horizontally. Avoid plunge styles.
Bra size is notoriously fickle between different lingerie brands; a C-cup at one store can easily be a D-cup at another, and some bra sizes can grow and shrink (especially in band size) over the course of a day or between washings. The best option is to know your bra size by taking bust measurements using these simple measuring instructions, which will ensure a perfect fit in band and in cup—and can even help you find the right amount of support.
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